The Need For Spinal Decompression Exercises To Protect The Discs

Once a spinal disc goes through some trauma or just long term use, it weakens. The disc gradually degenerates causing it to bulge outside the spinal vertebrae. That is the solid reason to begin spinal decompression exercises to prevent it early.

As it further deteriorates a likely herniation occurs, causing the vertebrae to contact one another and wear against each other. This is the beginning and progression of arthritis in the back.

Spine protection and prevention of disc deterioration starts early.

NOTE: This is not an article for the elderly. If you are in your 30s, your spine has already undergone a good deal of wear and tear. As you age, that alone will eventually result in back pain and stiffness. This article, in combination with healthy life habits will help you maintain a lifetime of back strength and comfort.

Much of the wear comes as a result of muscle weakness in the body core, including the back muscles supporting the spine. Everything from the waist up is putting pressure on the spinal vertebrae. The lower the vertebrae the more stress it is under from the upper body weight. This means the lumber section of the spine, the very lowest, is far more likely to degenerate faster than the rest.

This is why you see so many elderly people bending forward as they walk with difficulty. The good news is that difficulty can be reduced or better yet avoided completely with some preparatory fitness work.

The earlier you start spinal decompression exercises, the better.

It’s clear why exercise for core stability and back support is critical. Exercises for spinal decompression to relieve the pressure on the discs is critical. These two types of exercise taken up as part of a healthy lifestyle can prevent aging problems typical, especially in the lower back.

Specifically, decompression exercises are designed to relieve pressure on your vertebrae that eventually may result in damage to your spinal column. This means that much of the wear and tear on the spine can be avoided with a lifestyle of strategic but simple exercise.

Variety of exercises that provide full to partial spine decompression

Exercises can range in scope from free standing to working with various types of equipment. The video below, with Dr. Mark Wiley, shows a free standing spinal decompression exercise that will help keep your back in maximum health as far as disc protection goes.

The unique thing about this exercise is it covers the spinal column thoroughly, from the cervical (neck) to lumbar (lower back) region.

There are many exercises that will provide spinal “stretching”, providing beneficial relief of the spinal discs. Paying attention to the video above, exercises emulating that will add variety and benefit. That will also apply to your strength and conditioning workouts, whatever their specific purpose.

Valuable equipment to assist with spinal decompression exercise plans

There are many pieces of equipment that provide help in general fitness and in specifically relieving spinal compression. Jesse Cannone, with the Healthy Back Institute shows a few of the common devices useful in decompression exercises.

As mentioned, an exercise ball can provide significant benefit in allowing a person to stretch their back by lying across the ball on their stomach. Reaching forward with both hands, allowing the back to stretch across the ball, then pulling back, provides both strength and beneficial stretching.

The NewBax is a fairly new device that is very beneficial to safe, effective decompression exercise. While it does not focus on the cervical region of the neck, for the back, it is excellent.

For people who cannot use an inversion table, this piece of equipment used in conjunction with the free standing exercises in the first video can provide excellent results in both preventing and relieving spinal disc damage.

The benefits of inversion table therapy for spinal decompression

As mentioned, an exercise ball can provide significant benefit in allowing a person to stretch their back by lying across the ball on their stomach. Reaching forward with both hands, allowing the back to stretch across the ball, then pulling back, provides both strength and beneficial stretching.

The NewBax is a fairly new device that is very beneficial to safe, effective decompression exercise. While it does not focus on the cervical region of the neck, for the back, it is excellent.

For people who cannot use an inversion table, this piece of equipment used in conjunction with the free standing exercises in the first video can provide excellent results in both preventing and relieving spinal disc damage.

Finally, inversion table therapy is the most dramatic and sometimes controversial means of spinal decompression. Many people swear by the therapeutic effects of this type of treatment.

CAUTION: While there is no doubt it provides gravity based stretching all the way through the spine, it should be noted that it can be dangerous if not used correctly. People with any doubt about their health should check with their physician about the safety of an inversion table.

Anyone with circulatory problems, high blood pressure, heart disease should avoid inversion table therapy. Regardless of age or level of health, never use an inversion table without someone nearby.

In all the confusion about back pain there are clear solutions for many people.
In every type of back, spine, joint related issue there are multiple medical disciplines and confusing opinions. That said, with most any of those issues, including spinal decompression exercises, there are simple and effective self treatments that most anybody can perform.

The great thing about that is, they work and cost little relative to the positive results.